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Accelerator Research Division Postdoctoral Opportunities

The SLAC Accelerator Research Division (ARD) has the mission to develop accelerator science and technology that will enable new accelerators in photon science and high energy physics as well as other fields of science, medicine and industry with R&D aimed at near-term, mid-term, and long-term development. The ARD division is divided into several departments whose areas of research are summarized below and in the links therein. If you are interested in joining any of these cutting-edge accelerator science programs as a postdoctoral research associate, see the application information at the bottom of this page.

ADVANCED ACCELERATOR RESEARCH (RF) - Sami Tantawi

 

ADVANCED ACCELERATOR RESEARCH (LARP) - John Fox

Our efforts in instability control and Low Level RF (LLRF) systems combine interests in accelerator dynamics and instability control with technology expertise in high-speed signal processing. The research involves machine physics measurements, design and development of instability control hardware, development of theoretical models of the dynamic interaction between rf systems and particle beams, applications of control techniques to asses system stability and robustness, and the development of special accelerator instrumentation for experiments. Ongoing projects span the physics of dynamic systems and beam interactions with rf systems. The efforts include experimental measurements and development of simulation models and simulation tools.
 
The program has a very strong technology base, and designs and develops new instruments and control systems using a mix of wideband rf/microwave and fast digital electronic technologies. Current projects include activities at LHC in high-current rf system dynamics and wideband 2 GS/Sec feedback control systems for Ecloud instability control. Ongoing collaborations with KEK and LNF-INFN study impacts of coupledbunch instability control on transverse emittance in high-current storage rings, and the development of new beam diagnostics and control techniques.
 

ADVANCED ACCELERATOR RESEARCH (Dielectric Laser Acceleration) - Joel England 

In the Dielectric Laser Acceleration (DLA) Group, operating under SLAC Project E-163, we investigate the physics of laser linear acceleration in dielectric media. We experimentally test electron bunching at optical wavelengths, a key step in developing particle sources for laser accelerators, and devise and test optical-scale structures suitable for staged laser acceleration, an approach referred to colloquially as an "accelerator on a chip."  This experimental effort is part of a larger research program including efficient mode-locked laser development and advanced lithographic structure development.  Research associates have the opportunity to engage in advanced computer simulations, design and fabrication of micron-scale accelerators, and conducting demonstration experiments using electron beams and solid state lasers at the NLCTA facility at SLAC.
 
 

ADVANCED ACCELERATOR RESEARCH (Plasma Acceleration) - Mark Hogan

The Plasma Wakefield Accelerator (PWFA) Group uses the high energy electron and positron beams from the SLAC linac to drive large amplitude waves in high-density plasmas. These plasma waves have been used to accelerate and focus the particles with world record gradients over 1,000 times those used inrest of the linac. We are a small experimental team combining theory, computation and experiment to understand all aspects of beam-plasma interaction. Our efforts are focused on applying what we learn to revolutionize future accelerators and FELs. We use the beam from the first 2 km of the SLAC linac to drive large amplitude waves in high-density plasmas. These plasma waves have been used to accelerate and focus the particles with world record gradients over 1,000 times those used in the rest of the linac. We are a small experimental team combining theory, computation and experiment to understand all aspects of beam-plasma interaction. Our efforts are focused on applying what we learn to revolutionize future accelerators and FELs  ... more information  
 

ADVANCED COMPUTATION - Cho-Kuen Ng

More information.
 

BEAM PHYSICS - Yunhai Cai

more information

FACET & TEST FACILITIES (Vitaly Yakimenko & Carsten Hast)

The Test Facilities Department operates and supports accelerator test facilities at SLAC utilized to develop and test near-term solutions for accelerator systems, including rf structures and power sources, high brightness photo injectors, beam diagnostics, and collimation systems.  These facilities include the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA), Accelerator Structure Test Area (ASTA), and L-band rf test facilities at End Station B. It also support the operation of FACET, and the End Station Test Beam (ESTB) in End Station A (MDI and detector R&D), which will start beam operation in summer 2011. The members of the TF Department also perform basic research in beam physics, including coherent radiation generation, laser/beam interactions, and FEL seeding schemes ... more information

LHC ACCELERATOR RESEARCH - Tom Markiewicz

More LHC Accelerator Research at SLAC is supported through the US LARP Program. Postdoctoral opportunities are available through the LARP Toohig Fellowship Program. Currently, a successful Toohig candidate can participate via SLAC in either a program to supply a crab cavity system to the two high luminosity IRs at the LHC or a program to supply a wide bandwidth feedback system to CERN’s SPS injector ... more information.

FEL Physics - Zhirong Huang

More information.

APPLICATION INFORMATION

Postdoc positions are two-year academic appointments, renewable for a third year, to conduct original research under the guidance of the Stanford Faculty. A Ph.D. in physics or engineering is required. SLAC is an equal opportunity employer.

To apply, please send a letter with CV and a list of publications to the address below. In addition, arrange for three of your references to send their letters of recommendation directly to:

Dr. Robert J. Noble

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, MS 07,

2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025

Tel: (650) 926-4441      Fax: (650) 926-4365

Email: noble@slac.stanford.edu

 

 

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