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Arrivng Procedures for Users

Visitors: If you are just visiting SLAC and are not a user (that is, someone affiliated with an accepted experiment at FACET & TF), you need to be invited by a SLAC employee who will arrange the site visit by filling out the site entry request form. ID will be required by the security guards on the Sand Hill Gate.

 

 

 

 

 

First-time Users must first get registered and complete the online training courses prior to arrival at SLAC. Follow the instructions here.

Please feel free to provide feedback on VUE center experience.

Planning your arrival (first and repeat visits)

Each individual must check that the information in their profile in the User Portal is up-to-date and check that they have completed their assigned training (https://userportal.slac.stanford.edu/). If they do not have an account, they must register. Review the information on the webpage in the "Before you arrive" section (https://userportal.slac.stanford.edu/before-you-arrive).

There are new requirements for Foreign Nationals. See the  "Before you arrive" section (https://userportal.slac.stanford.edu/before-you-arrive) for details. Expect delays at the badging office.

Notify your Facility POC and the FACET User Manager (Christine Clarke) once you know your travel plans and share the details (arrival date-time, departure date-time). Often the Principal Investigator or single POC for an experiment does this for all participants at once (this is preferred).
 
The FACET User Manager will schedule practical training sessions to coincide with your arrival as is necessary. Please organize this directly with the FACET User Manager through a single POC per experiment team.
 

Arrival - Picking up your badge and dosimeter

Unless you are just going to the general access areas (the Rad Worker training room and majority of meeting rooms fall under general access areas) during business hours, you need to have a SLAC ID badge and dosimeter. Any after-hours access needs a SLAC ID badge, even the general access areas.

Review “while you are here” information on the User Portal (https://userportal.slac.stanford.edu/while-you-are-here). Upon arriving at SLAC, show photo identification to Security at the Main Gate on Sand Hill Road and check-in User Office in the VUE Center (https://vue.slac.stanford.edu/vue-center). If you are not a US citizen, you will need to show original passport and visa documents and your CV.

Outside of working hours, you can usually get a temporary badge and/or dosimeter at the Main Gate if we have advance notice and have already verified immigration documents and pre-signed the form A. The form A can be accessed here. Send this to the FACET User Manager Christine Clarke(cclarke@slac.stanford.edu) with your expected arrival time. She will send you back the signed copy. Print it off and bring it with you to the Main Gate. You won't be allowed on site without a badge outside of working hours.

If you have a Radiation Worker Practical session scheduled, please aim to be on site ~20 minutes before the scheduled training. Parking is very limited near the training room and it may take time to find a place to park and walk there. You do not need a badge or dosimeter to go to the training room- you can go straight there upon arrival at SLAC.

 
Once your training and documentation is verified at the VUE center (building 53), you will be issued a badge and dosimeter.

Just to repeat - you need to have a SLAC ID badge and dosimeter for working at the facilities. The only places where you can get away without are in the general access area. None of our facilities is located in the general access area.
 

Ready to Work

 
Don't forget to get your site orientation before working inside FACET, ESA, ESB/NLCTA and ASTA. Your facility POC will be able to give this and confirm that you are allowed to begin work.

 

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SLAC SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA
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