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LCLS-II Instruments Workshops, 19-22 March 2012

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SLAC Conferences, Workshops & Symposiums > LCLS-II Instruments Workshops, 19-22 March 2012
LCLS Instrument CXI

 LCLS-II New Instruments Workshops

March 19-22, 2012
Redwood Rooms, Building 48
SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory
Menlo Park, CA

 
In April, 2009, the LCLS began operations as the first hard x-ray Free Electron Laser (FEL). Based on the early scientific success, DOE encouraged SLAC to develop the LCLS-II project which includes the delivery of two new independent FEL beams, one for soft and one for hard x-ray science, into a new experimental hall.
 
The LCLS-II New Instruments Workshops, March 19-22, 2012, are the forum for the LCLS user community to provide input for the choices of the new x-ray instruments for LCLS-II. Individual workshops will present science drivers and instrumentation needs for biology, materials and chemical sciences and atomic, molecular and optical physics. At the workshops, concepts for new LCLS-II instruments will be presented and talks will address the scientific opportunities with LCLS-II and the instrumentation needs to achieve these goals. The workshops include ample discussion time for the community to provide critical input to the new instruments. The report from this workshop will form the basis of an LCLS-II instrument proposal. We sincerely request LCLS users to attend and help define the priorities in building the next generation of x-ray instruments at LCLS.

  


Request for short contributed talks:

We welcome attendees to present a single viewgraph describing a scientific opportunity and the instrumentation tools needed to accomplish it.  The contributed presentations should be sent to Phil Heimann paheim@slac.stanford.edu and Jerry Hastings jbh@slac.stanford.edu by Thursday, March 15, 2012.

Announcements
Invited Speakers
Please contact Theresa Wong for your travel arrangements.

SLAC SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA
Operated by Stanford University for the U.S. Dept. of Energy