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An Office of Science User Facility

LCLS Standard Configurations for Run 15

 

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AMO Standard Configuration for Run 15

With this new standard configuration, AMO will be able to support various time-resolved X-ray and/or IR pump X-ray probe experiments examining the ultrafast molecular dynamics in gas phase.

 
To be considered for scheduling in this standard configuration, users will be required to include a table in the proposal that lists the specific experimental parameters to ensure compatibility with these configurations. If the experimental parameters are not compatible with the standard configuration or if the table of parameters is incomplete, the proposal will be reviewed and considered for scheduling as general user proposal.  Please see the table of required parameters. To be considered for scheduling in this standard configuration, users will be required to include a table in the proposal that lists the specific experimental parameters to ensure compatibility with these configurations. If the experimental parameters are not compatible with the standard configuration or if the table of parameters is incomplete, the proposal will be reviewed and considered for scheduling as general user proposal.

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CXI Standard Configuration for Run 15

Liquid Jets with the CXI 1 micron Focus

CXI will be configured to use the 1 micron KB focus inside the 1 micron sample chamber. The liquid jet mechanical system will be available and any sample delivery system compatible with this mechanical system using the standard nozzle rods will be supported. This included Gas Dynamic Virtual Nozzle (GDVN), Lipidic Cubic Phase (LCP), the Microfluidic Electrokinetic Sample Holder (MESH) or other viscous extrusion systems and any other system that can be mounted on the nozzle rod. The CXI sample chamber will be equipped with an on-axis jet viewing system as well as a perpendicular high-resolution jet imaging system. A post-sample attenuator mount will be available. Also supported will be time-resolved experiments employing either: a nanosecond optical parametric oscillator (410-2200 nm); the fundamental (800 nm) or second harmonic (400 nm) of the CXI, ~50-150fs Ti:Sapphire laser; or a wavelength accessible by the CXI femtosecond optical parametric amplifier (480-2400 nm). The pump laser beam will be delivered collinear to the x-ray beam with in-coupling ~250 mm upstream of the sample. The CXI time tool will be available for fs laser experiments.

With this standard configuration, CXI will be able to support Serial Femtosecond Crystallography (SFX) experiments with or without a pump laser and Small Angle and Wide Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS/WAXS) with or without a pump laser using a wide variety of sample delivery methods, either LCLS-owned or supplied by the user groups. Two full size CSPADs will be available.

See the detailed description of the CXI Standard Configuration.

To be considered for scheduling in this standard configuration, users will be required to include a table in the proposal that lists the specific experimental parameters to ensure compatibility with these configurations. If the experimental parameters are not compatible with the standard configuration or if the table of parameters is incomplete, the proposal will be reviewed and considered for scheduling as general user proposal. Please see the  table of required parameters. No fundamental changes to the standard configurations will occur, but some details of the configuration may be updated in response to inquiries, so users should recheck the website before submitting your proposal to confirm that you have the latest information. Address any questions to the instrument staff.

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MEC Standard Configuration for Run 15

X-Ray Diffraction or Thomson Scattering on Shocked Material

The MEC instrument will provide two standard configurations during run 14 for the study of shock-compressed material. One configuration will be optimized for X-ray diffraction (XRD) with a large angular coverage, and a second configuration will be optimized for XRD with a reduced angular coverage to accommodate forward and backward X-ray Thomson scattering spectrometers (XRTS). Both configurations will employ the nanosecond drive laser and the VISAR diagnostic in a fixed geometry for the angles between the target, drive laser, LCLS beam, VISAR, XRTS, and XRD detectors. Users will be able to select X-ray photon energy (SASE only), X-ray spot size on target, and nanosecond drive laser energy and temporal pulse shape.

See the detailed description of the MEC Standard Configuration.

To be considered for scheduling in either standard configuration, users will be required to add a table in the proposal that lists the specific experimental parameters to ensure compatibility with these configurations. If the experimental parameters are not compatible with the standard configuration or if the table of parameters is incomplete, the proposal will be reviewed and considered for scheduling as general user proposal. Please see the  table of required parameters. No fundamental changes to the standard configurations will occur, but some details of the configuration may be updated in response to inquiries, so Users should recheck the website before submitting your proposal to confirm that you have the latest information. Address any questions to the MEC instrument staff.

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SXR Standard Configuration for Run 15

#1: The liquid jet end station in SXR

The LCLS facility owned liquid jet experimental end station, capable of investigating chemical dynamics in the liquid phase, will be offered as SXR’s Run 15 standard configuration. A newly commissioned, varied line-space plane grating spectrometer, optimized to operate from 250 eV to 2000 eV with an expected resolving power of 1500 to as high as 3000 at lower energies will be offered as well. The spectrometer can operate outside of the optimized energy range with compromised performance. The spectrum is detected with an in-vacuum CCD binned along the spectral energy direction to enable 120Hz readout. In this standard configuration the spectrometer is mounted perpendicular to the x-ray beam in the horizontal plane. The plane of the spectrometer optical elements will be vertical—parallel to the flow direction of the jet. For absorption spectroscopy, the LJE instrument will also have an in vacuum CCD mounted in a transmission geometry in SXR’s monitor tank assembly, located approximately 2 meters downstream of the X-ray interaction. The monitor tank will have two selectable filters for attenuation prior to detection. Thus, detailed investigations of valence electronic structure and the chemical state for chemically and biologically relevant molecular dynamics are possible both with resonant and non-resonant X-ray emission and absorption spectroscopies.

Time-resolved experiments employing tunable femtosecond pulses will be supported under this standard configuration. The fundamental and harmonics (800, 400 and 267 nm) of the SXR, ~50 fs Ti:Sapphire laser will be available, delivered to the sample collinearly with the x-rays. The configuration can also be used with a TOPAS-Prime Optical Parametric Amplifier (OPA) capable of 480-2400 nm output.

See the detailed description of the SXR Standard Configuration.

To be considered for scheduling in this standard configuration, users will be required to include a table in the proposal that lists the specific experimental parameters to ensure compatibility with these configurations. If the experimental parameters are not compatible with the standard configuration or if the table of parameters is incomplete, the proposal will be reviewed and considered for scheduling as general user proposal. The technical details of the standard configurations and the table of required parameters are available at http://whateverthewebsiteaddresswillbe. No fundamental changes to the standard configurations will occur, but some details of the configuration may be updated in response to inquiries, so users should consult the website prior to proposal submission for the latest information. Address any questions to the SXR instrument staff. See the table of required parameters for Stanford Configuration #1

No fundamental changes to the standard configurations will occur, but some details of the configuration may be updated in response to inquiries, so users should recheck the website before submitting your proposal to confirm that you have the latest information. Address any questions to the SXR instrument staff.

 

#2: The RSXS end station in SXR

The Soft X-Materials hutch (SXR) will offer the RSXS end station to focus on time-resolved pump-probe resonant soft x-ray scattering and diffraction in the study of temporal dynamics in charge, spin, orbital, or lattice order in solid state materials. This end station is capable of achieving sample environment base pressures better than 10-8 Torr, and a sample loading/transfer system is installed for the rapid change of samples. In addition to the typical scattering angle in the horizontal plane (Θ), a motorized sample stage allows the sample to be rotated azimuthally about its surface normal (Φ) and to be pivoted in the vertical plane (χ). This sample stage is thermally contacted to a temperature control system, consisting of a liquid Helium cryostat and a heater, allowing the sample temperature to be changed from 15 K to 400 K. There are total six degrees of freedom for the sample: three translational (x, y, z from manipulator) and three rotational degrees of freedom (Θ,χ,Φ) with a differentially pumped rotary seal. The setup can be used with or without the ~100 fs SXR pump laser, which will deliver pulses of one wavelength per experiment from 800 nm, 1150-2400 nm or 4-17 microns. Pump pulses will be collinear with the x-rays.

This end station has two avalanche photodiodes and a multi-channel plate (MCP) detector. These detectors are mounted on a fully motorized in-vacuum detector stage, allowing detector manipulation in both horizontal (360 degrees) & vertical (90 degrees) scattering planes. Such capability can be used to efficiently search for super-lattice reflections over the full range of reciprocal space. X-ray absorption (XAS) measurements may also be performed by measuring total fluorescence yield.

See the detailed description of the SXR Standard Configuration #2.

To be considered for scheduling in this standard configuration, users will be required to include a table in the proposal that lists the specific experimental parameters to ensure compatibility with these configurations. If the experimental parameters are not compatible with the standard configuration or if the table of parameters is incomplete, the proposal will be reviewed and considered for scheduling as general user proposal. See the table of required parameters for Standard Configuration #2

No fundamental changes to the standard configurations will occur, but some details of the configuration may be updated in response to inquiries, so users should recheck the website before submitting your proposal to confirm that you have the latest information. Address any questions to the SXR instrument staff.  

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XCS Standard Configuration for Run 15

Time-resolved solution scattering/emission spectroscopy

The X-ray Pump Probe instrument will provide the following standard configuration #2 during run 14 for the study of time-resolved solution scattering and/or emission spectroscopy. The incident photon energy is fixed to 9.5 keV.The setup consists of a helium purged sample environment, a round or flat liquid jet and the sample recirculation system driven by HPLC pumps, a CSPAD-2.3M detector for wide angle x-ray scattering measurements and a von Hamos spectrometer with a CS140k detector for x-ray emission spectroscopy measurements. The spectrometer is available for any of the following emission lines: Mn Kß1,3, Kß2,5 and Kα, Fe Kß1,3 and Kß2,5, Co Kß1,3 and Kß2,5, Ni Kß1,3 and Kß2,5, Ti Kß1,3 and Kß2,5 and V Kα. A femtosecond optical pump laser laser in collinear geometry with a wavelength in the range of 480-2400 nm will be available.
 
 
To be considered for scheduling in this standard configuration, users will be required to include a table in the proposal that lists the specific experimental parameters to ensure compatibility with these configurations. If the experimental parameters are not compatible with the standard configuration or if the table of parameters is incomplete, the proposal will be reviewed and considered for scheduling as general user proposal. Please see the table of required parameters for Standard Configuration. No fundamental changes to the standard configurations will occur, but some details of the configuration may be updated in response to inquiries, so users should recheck the website before submitting your proposal to confirm that you have the latest information. Address any questions to the instrument staff.
 
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XPP Standard Configuration for Run 15

Kappa goniometer for time-resolved diffraction

The X-ray Pump Probe instrument will provide the following standard configuration #1 during run 14 for time-resolved x-ray diffraction. The setup consists of a Kappa goniometer for sample manipulation with all 6 degrees of freedom, and a CS140k detector mounted on the detector robot arm for measurement of the diffracted x-rays over most of the upper reciprocal hemisphere. The incident photon energy is fixed to 9.5 keV. The Oxford nitrogen cryostream can be used to control the sample temperature down to 100 K. A femtosecond optical pump laser in collinear geometry with a wavelength in the range of 480-2400 nm will be available.

See the detailed description of the XPP Standard Configuration.

To be considered for scheduling in this standard configuration, users will be required to include a table in the proposal that lists the specific experimental parameters to ensure compatibility with these configurations. If the experimental parameters are not compatible with the standard configuration or if the table of parameters is incomplete, the proposal will be reviewed and considered for scheduling as general user proposal. Please see the table of required parameters for Standard Configuration. No fundamental changes to the standard configurations will occur, but some details of the configuration may be updated in response to inquiries, so users should recheck the website before submitting your proposal to confirm that you have the latest information. Address any questions to the instrument staff.

 

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